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How-to-proof-bread-dough-(second-rise)-without-plastic-wrap

Proofing Bread Dough without Plastic Wrap

I despise the second proofing of bread dough – you know, after you’ve let it rise in bowl, and have shaped it into a loaf, buns, or rounds for pizza?  I hate it because it needs to be covered, but it’s so hard to cover it with plastic wrap and keep it from sticking to the dough.  I used to spray the plastic wrap, but that, too is a pain.

how-to-proof-bread-dough

A couple of weeks ago I made a big batch of pizza dough and realized I could just cover the dough balls with plastic containers or bowls to keep the air from getting to them while they were doing the second rise.  Easy peasy!

proofing-bread-dough

Hello, there, little Pizza Dough Ball.

Granted, my counter looks little weird with a bunch of upside down containers on it, but my family doesn’t judge if I make them bread.

Linking up to Kitchen Tip Tuesdays at Tammy’s Recipes!

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  1. I was just thinking about this today as I was making bread because I never buy plastic wrap. What a smart idea. Do you just use a towel for the first rise, when it’s still in the bowl?

    • I have some bowls that had lids, so that’s often what I use – but sometimes I still use plastic wrap for a really tight seal (for the first rise when it’s in a bowl).

  2. Carrie, is your bread recipe on the site? I have yet to find one worth my time.

  3. Carrie…is there any way to get your pizza dough recipe? I have been on the lookout for one that works well at high altitude, but I’ve had no luck so far. Nothing has been turning out just right, so I keep buying pizza dough at Whole Foods. It’s yummy, but a little inconvenient since I live in Monument.

    • Well, here’s a link to someone else who has posted it. http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/294926 It’s from Cuisine at Home magazine and I don’t personally feel comfortable reprinting it unless I make personal changes to the recipe (because all recipes are copyright). I’m not sure what’s with all of the warnings from that user; I don’t think it’s *that* fussy! There are other, faster recipes out there; but this one has great flavor and chewiness because of how long it’s allowed to rise. It’s actually a good recipe to use on somewhat busy days, since you can start it in the morning, let it rise for 4 hours, and then divide it into pieces and let it rise another 4 hours.

      I’m making a batch right now and I’m going to try using it as pita bread.

      • Thank you so much! Wow, there really are a lot of warnings. :) She makes it sound like a nightmare, but I’ll take your word and give it a try! Do you make any adjustments to the amount of yeast or water?

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